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Make it Mirsada https://makeitmirsada.com Art in All Forms Fri, 20 Mar 2020 21:03:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://makeitmirsada.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/cropped-IMG_6139-2-32x32.jpg Make it Mirsada https://makeitmirsada.com 32 32 169209374 Visiting the The American Museum of Natural History https://makeitmirsada.com/visiting-the-american-museum-of-natural-history/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=visiting-the-american-museum-of-natural-history https://makeitmirsada.com/visiting-the-american-museum-of-natural-history/#respond Mon, 18 Nov 2019 17:00:02 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=32 In this handy guide, we’ve put together some helpful info and tips to enhance your next visit to: The American Museum of Natural History.

The American Museum of Natural History is one of the largest natural history museums in the world. It is housed in a complex comprising of 28 interconnected buildings!

I want you to visualize your past experiences at any museum and see what comes to mind. Now imagine visiting one of the largest museum on the planet! Can you handle it?

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Visiting the American Museum of Natural History

In this handy guide, we’ve put together some helpful info and tips to enhance your next visit to The American Museum of Natural History.

The American Museum of Natural History is easily one of the largest natural history museums in the world. It is housed in a complex comprising of 28 interconnected buildings!

I want you to visualize a past experience at any museum and see what comes to mind. Now imagine visiting one of the largest museum on the planet! Can you handle it?

Getting Started

Begin with planning

As mentioned above, this is the largest natural history museum on the planet. There are always so many exhibits happening at any moment, so you may not be able to see it all in a single visit. You can plan your tour in a way that allows you to see the exhibits and events that interest you the most. For instance, I always make it a top priority to visit any new exhibits first, then check out some of my usual favorites like the Fossil and Mammal Halls later in the day.

Photo: Courtesy of amnh.org

Essential items to carry:

Capturing memories is an important part of any museum visit. As such, here are some important items you can carry with you, including:

  • A camera: If you think your phone camera will not be enough, carry another one with extra batteries.

  • Get a map of the museum: Technology has made things easier; you can simply download a free Explorer app for iOS and Android. There is also a PDF map of the museum. You can’t lose your way.

  • Your passes and identification documents

  • Your tickets

  • Cash/credit cards

Consider the following:

  • Buying tickets in advance. They are available online and will help you avoid waiting in lines for admission.

  • Get to know CityPASSES. This will help you save close to 50% on top attractions

Visit in groups. School and camp visits are always cheaper.

Location, Location, Location

The American Museum of Natural History is located at Central Park West & 79th St, New York, NY 10024.

Common Questions You May Have:

One of the aims of the AMNH is to ensure easy and free accessibility to all facilities for everyone. As mentioned earlier, however, it has 33 million+ specimens, which cannot be displayed all at once. The key is discovering the right time to make your move.

It depends on the events of the day and when they close. Therefore, get the list of events and the time they are listed, you can then get the best time to visit.

As long as you have the essential tools mentioned above, traveling in and around the museum should be easy. Consider the following, for convenience:

  • Public transport: There are busses like the M79, which make it easy for travelers. But taking the subway seems a much better option. It is faster, though more costly, if you don’t have passes.

  • Bike parking: Use the bicycle racks in the driveway of the museum’s Rose Center for Earth. There is space at the parking garage, as well.

  • Taxi vs. Driving: These are more expensive options but can save you on time if you are up for it.

I don’t recommend driving, as with most places in NYC, there is not much street parking available. This area currently has a lot of construction zones as well, making the driving situation even more of a nightmare. There are a few parking garages in the area, but be warned, they tend to be pricey. 

The museum is a massive phenomenon. You will, therefore, need a ticket to get in. The problem is, you will always get tourist crowds and ticket lines. This can be overwhelming and sometimes discouraging.

Why should you go through such trouble when there is an easy way out? Simply go online and purchase your tickets beforehand. You skip the lines if you already have your ticket.

Ensure you review each ticket type, though. Some give you access to special exhibitions, films, and shows.

Fun Facts:

AMNH has 45 permanent halls dedicated to exhibitions. There is also a planetarium and a library. Here are a few more facts about the museum:

  • It is more than 150 years old. Established in 1869.
  • It sits on a surface of more than 2 million square feet (190,000 m 2 ).
  • It houses a collection exceeding 33 million specimens. These include plants, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, human remains, and cultural artifacts.
  • Only a small fraction on these specimens are displayed at any given time.
  • It served by a full-time scientific staff of 225 individuals.
  • Every year, the museum sponsors more than 120 field expeditions.
  • It receives more than 5 million visits annually.

A brief history of the museum

  • April 1969 – New York Governor, John Thomson Hoffman signs a bill to officially create the AMNH.
  • 1869 to 1877 – Housed in the Arsenal building in Central Park.
  • 1874 – Cornerstone laid for the first building, now hidden by many other buildings.
  • 1877 – The original Gothic building opened.
  • 1877 to 1930 –Major expansions starting with the south range.
  • 1992 to 2015 – Planning and addition of the Memorial Hall and the library.
  • To date –​ Other minor additions approved expansions of 2016 by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, NY.
Photo: Courtesy of amnh.org
Photo: Courtesy of amnh.org

While At The Museum

How do you navigate the museum?

For a start, every visitor is required to pass through the security checkpoints. This ensures the safety of the visitors, staff, and stuff. This process may take a while since you will be required to open your bags.

But the most important thing to consider is carrying a museum map. You’ll want to see everything from the Milstein Family Hall of Ocean Life (I personally love this one) to the Anne and Bernard Spitzer Hall of Human Origins.

Photo: Courtesy of ny.curbed.com
Photo: Courtesy of en.wikipedia.org

Guided Tours

  • Highlights Tour – daily between 10:15 and 3:15

  • Spotlight tours- Focused on specific halls or themes

  • Explainers – come with volunteers to answer questions and explain fossils.

  • Private group tours – there are a number of them at your disposal

  • Use the free Explorer App.

What areas of the museum do I *HAVE* to visit?

The truth is, this massive museum contains a significant record of this planet’s history.

It is hard to say for sure which areas once must visit. It all depends on what you are most interested in. From animal fossils to human culture, plants to sea life, there is literally something for everyone.

Check out some of my recommended events and exhibits in the next section.

Events and exhibits you shouldn’t miss:

There are several special exhibitions you need to be aware of. Among, many, there is:

  • The Hayden Planetarium Space Show. This is a virtual reality show that ends on July 2027
  • Our senses. This is an exhibition that drives you to understand your senses better. 

Permanent exhibits

  • Birds and Reptiles and Amphibian Halls. Here, you will get four halls displaying a variety of the stated said classes of animals.
  • Earth and planetary sciences hall. Divided into three halls, experience the study of meteorite segments from different parts of the universe.
  • Fossil Halls. This is the largest and most popular attraction site of the museum. It contains fossils and pre-historic creatures – dealing with advanced topics.
  • Human Origin and Cultural halls. Understand human history.
  • Mammal halls. An in-depth look into the mammal world.
  • Rose Centre for Earth and Space. Display a clear picture of our universe.
  • Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall. Explore the life of Theodore Roosevelt
  • The Discovery Room. Comes with an element of wonder and discovery
  • “Hands-on” experiences. If you love to get handy with everything, there are several fun activities at the museum you can enjoy with your family. All you need have to do is know where the events are set and how to get there.

5 student and family programs that are offered by the museum

The American Museum of Natural History has more to offer. There are programs that have been designed both for students as well as family members to benefit from.

Student programs

  • Adventures in Science classes: This program is designed to cover all areas in Museum science. It is meant for children in grades pre-K-5. 

  • Lang science program: Are you looking for a hands-on science exploration? Then this is the program for you. The program is ideally meant for middle and high school students in New Tork City.

  • Science Alliance program: This is a hands-on investigation program for kids. It is mostly targeted at preschoolers who would like to become part of the museum’s investigators. 

Family programs

  • The Early Adventure program: This program is meant for young children, their parents as well as caregivers. It is meant to encourage exploration among young children.

  • The science and nature program: This program is designed to help young children understand as well as respect the natural world and get skills for scientific inquiry. 

Photo Ops!

Capture the best moments with popular photo opportunities/ spots. Unless stated otherwise, you are free to take photos in any area of the museum. You can pause at the entrance with your family as you exit and get some great shots!

What’s next ?

Gift Shops

Now that you are done admiring the museum, why not take a moment to check out the gift shop? This is one of the best ways to ensure you have your very own little piece of museum history to carry back home.

Popular restaurants with local cuisine

By now you’ve probably walked the equivalent of a mini New York City marathon inside the museum. Naturally, this will be a big drain your on your energy, and you may have to refill afterwards. Luckily for you, there are several restaurants that serve a variety of delicious local cuisine. The food court provides a wide range of family-friendly fare. Get foods such as burgers, pizza, sandwiches, tacos, salads, and sushi. The Shake Shack behind the museum has top rated burgers and shakes. There are carts across the street as well, where hot dogs are served. Finally if your feeling even more adventourous, take a stroll and check out some of the other local restaurants in the area.

Discuss it at home.

At the museum, you probably did more “seeing” and less “talking”. If there is anything you wish to discuss, now it a great time to share your favorite moments, exhibits and experiences with your friends and family. If you took advantage of the Photo Ops, be sure to share those as well!

“I’ve always been a ‘jack of all trades’ kind of person. I consider myself to be a true generalist, and a bit of an autodidact with constant thirst for knowledge. Growing up, I was always that one kid in the room that took all the toys apart and spent the next couple hours figuring out how to put them back together again. This reverse-engineering, logical and structured mindset has always been the central core of my personality…until I met Mirsada, and was introduced to ART!

Art became this puzzle that couldn’t simply solve by breaking it down and put back together again. Mirsada taught me to embrace art for all it’s intrinsic values. I soon realized that artists expressed themselves directly through their work. I learned that true masters of art are even able to convey all their thoughts, emotions, experiences, aspirations, and even their souls to those that bear witness to their work.

Currently, I work in the pharmaceutical and healthcare sectors at some of the largest hospital systems in NYC. I also write for my Personal Finance blog, Simoners.com

In a city so immersed in art culture, I’m soaking it in each and everyday in a self-indulgent pursuit to understand art in all forms.”

— Isaiah Simon

Connect & Follow

Website

Where to next?

Categories

— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

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Artist Intro: Paul Jackson Pollock https://makeitmirsada.com/artist-intro-paul-jackson-pollock-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=artist-intro-paul-jackson-pollock-2 https://makeitmirsada.com/artist-intro-paul-jackson-pollock-2/#respond Mon, 11 Nov 2019 14:00:50 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=2781 In this article I’ll introduce you to this amazing artist!

Paul Jackson Pollock also know as “Jackson Pollock” was an American painter. Was born January 28, 1912, Cody, WY and died August 11, 1956, Springs, NY.

He was the first American painter celebrity. He was in magazines, did interviews and even recorded a video while painting.

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ARTIST INTRO: PAUL JACKSON POLLOCK

Birthplace: Cody, Wyoming

Favorite mediums: Household paint on horizontal canvas

Styles/Period: Abstract expressionism, Drip Painting, Expressionism, Modern art, Action painting.

Who Was Pollock?

Paul Jackson Pollock also know as “Jackson Pollock”  was an American painter. Was born January 28, 1912, Cody, WY and died August 11, 1956, Springs, NY.  He was the first American painter celebrity. He was in magazines and did interview even had a video of him painting.

Early Life

Pollock was married to  Lee Krasner from 1945 to 1956. Lee Krasner was also an artist but was over shadowed by her husband. However, she played a major role in his career development. Krasner was the one to introducing him to many influential collectors, critics, and artists.

John Bernard Myers, a noted art dealer, was once quoted as saying, "there would never have been a Jackson Pollock without a Lee Pollock"

Pollock's Paintings

Pollock was known for paintings in Abstract expressionism, Expressionism, Modern art, Action painting.  Pollock’s most famous paintings were made during the “drip period” between 1947 and 1950. 

“The painting has a life of its own. I try to let it come through.”

Convergence, 1952 by Jackson Pollock. Courtesy of jackson-pollock.org

He was a  major figure in the abstract expressionist movement. His technique of pouring or splashing liquid household paint onto a horizontal surface, enabling him to view and paint his canvases from all angles. They said that his painting was like a dance. Pollock   He is also known for taking the easel out of painting. 

“My painting does not come from the easel.”

Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), 1950 by Jackson Pollock. Courtesy of jackson-pollock.org

Abstract Expressionism, and the varied work produced by the Abstract Expressionists, resists definition as a “cohesive style.” Instead, these artists shared an interest in using abstraction to convey strong emotional or expressive content.

“Today painters do not have to go to a subject matter outside of themselves. Most modern painters work from a different source. They work from within.”

Blue Poles, 1952 by Jackson Pollock. Courtesy of jackson-pollock.org

Death And Family

Pollock was a troubled person. Some historians say that he may have had a bipolar disorder and he also struggled with alcoholism. Pollock died at the age of 44 in a single-car accident driving under the influence of alcohol when his wife was away in Europe.

The accident happened less than a mile from his home, taking the lives of both Pollock and one of the passengers, Edith Metzger. The other passenger Ruth Kligman, an artist, and Pollock’s mistress, survived the accident.

Ocean Greyness, 1953 by Jackson Pollock. Courtesy of jackson-pollock.org
White Light, 1954 by Jackson Pollock. Courtesy of jackson-pollock.org

Major Museums That Contain Pollock’s Works

If you wish to see Pollock’s work on display you can find some at these locations:

  • The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago’s Grant Park
  • The National Gallery of Art, and its attached Sculpture Garden,
  •  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Museum of Modern Art
  • The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 
  • The Chrysler Museum of Art 

Media

Video: How Jackson Pollock Changed Painting Forever by Sotheby's

sdr

” I believe in embracing “Art in All Forms”. Art is all around us, and sometimes you just need to slow down and take a closer look. Art carries many stories and has always been an integral part of human history. It is continuously evolving, changing and adapting to the world around it—Just like human beings, or any other living organism.

I created this blog to build a community to help budding and experienced artists connect, grow and create together. It’s a place where artists can learn and share information, and to keep art meaningful in there lives. Whether it’s going to a museum to observe art, tips on how to improve one’s skills, or simply answer the question, “Where do I even start?”

During my studies, I chose to hone and refine my skills through constant learning, experimentation and practice. I have over 10 years of experience, with a background in painting, sculpture, printmaking, art history and architecture. Recently, I have started to explore photography as well.

I truly believe that we are all born artists and simply forgot…it is never too late to re-start, it is never too late to remember that you are already an artist.”

— Mirsada Simon

Connect & Follow

Where to next?

Categories

— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

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Artist Intro: Pablo Picasso https://makeitmirsada.com/artist-intro-pablo-picasso/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=artist-intro-pablo-picasso https://makeitmirsada.com/artist-intro-pablo-picasso/#respond Mon, 04 Nov 2019 14:00:44 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=2780 In this article I’ll introduce you to this amazing artist!

Pablo Picasso was one of the most talented artists in the 20th century. The world failed to judge him and nobody took notice of his masterpieces during his life. But when he died, his art was sold in the billions.

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ARTIST INTRO: PABLO PICASSO

Birthplace: Malaga, Spain

Favorite mediums: Oil Paint on Canvas

Styles/Periods: Blue Period, Rose Period, African Period, Cubism, Classicism, Surrealism.

Who Was Pablo?

Pablo Picasso was one of the most talented artists in the 20th century. The world failed to judge him and nobody took notice of his masterpieces during his life. But when he died, his art was sold in billions. He was keen to do paintings since his childhood and used to make amazing portraits of his friends.

Early Life

Picasso, a great artist from Malaga, Spain, was born on 25th Oct, 1881. His father was Don José Ruiz Blasco, a painter and art teacher in a nearby school. He learned the basic knowledge of arts from his father. 

Picasso learned the basic painting from his father during his early childhood. His father once noticed him painting over his incomplete pigeon sketch with a great technique. He realized that Picasso already had surpassed his skills at a very young age of thirteen. So, he granted all his painting tools to him. 

He recalled his childhood days one day, “When I was a child, my mother said to me, ‘If you become a soldier, you’ll be a general. If you become a monk you’ll end up as the pope, instead, I became a painter and wound up as Picasso.”

Photo of Pablo Picasso. Courtesy of britannica.com
Photo of Pablo Picasso. Courtesy of bbc.co.uk

Picasso’s School Life

Picasso didn’t have much interest in studies. Acknowledging that, his father sent him to Barcelona’s prestigious School of Fine Arts in year 1895. He wasn’t able to study there properly because of strict rules and formalities. So, he returned back without wasting any time.

In 1897, when he was sixteen years old, he moved to Madrid to attend the Royal Academy of San Fernando. However, he once again failed to study there as the main focus over there was on classical subjects that he had no interest about. 

 

In 1899, he returned to Barcelona and met a lot of artist and intellectuals over there. These anarchists and radicals inspired him a lot and he moved away from the classical methods that he learned during his school life to adopt reality-based methods to work with for the rest of his life. 

After that, his father sent him to Paris where he met with a few genius painters and developed new skills. He kept progressing in his field during his stay in Paris. He didn’t only work on the blue and pink painting but mastered them. Then he returned to Spain and started making paintings.

Picasso's Paintings

Picasso is best known for his innovative paintings, switching between styles with such skill that we are bound to assume that his life work is not a single man’s effort, rather a work of several artists.

As per the Biography.com website, “Whenever I wanted to say something, I said it the way I believed I should,” he explained. “Different themes inevitably require different methods of expression. This does not imply either evolution or progress; it is a matter of following the idea one wants to express and the way in which one wants to express it.”

His portraits were a little strange earlier on, but no one could imagine he is going to be a legend later on. His works kept better and better as he grew up. When he was 15, his father was convinced about his painting skills so he granted him all the painting tools he had and advised him to adapt painting as a profession. 

Blue Period (1901-1904)

Mostly, the artists divide Picasso’s art works into different periods. Blue period is the first one of them and is named after the dominant blue color he used during in almost all his paintings during this period. 

During his stay in Paris, France, Picasso was frustrated following the death of his best friend, Carlos Cassagemas and painted a lot of scenes of poverty, isolation, and anguish, mostly shaded blue and green. His most famous paintings during this period are known as “La Vie”, “The Old Guitarist”, and “Blue Nude”. He finished all these paintings in 1903. 

The Old Guitarist, 1903 by Pablo Picasso. Courtesy of www.PabloPicasso.org

Rose Period (1904-06)

Picasso reformed a bit from the pain of his friend’s death by the year 1905 so he started using light colors including pink and red. Therefore, this period is known as “Red Period”. He again created a few wonderful paintings including “Family at Saltimbanques” (1905), “Gertrude Stein” (1905-06) and “Two Nudes” (1906).

African Period

In 1907, Picasso first witnessed the archaic African art in a museum exhibition in Trocadero. He got inspired by the primitive idols, statues and masks. He took the path and simplified the characters shapes to look like wooden or stone idols. He knew that the primitive man was supposed to live within the nature, thus, gave equal attention to the characters surrounding the main figure. A few of his masterpieces during this period came in the shape of “Dance of the Veils”, “Three Women”, “Dryad”, “Woman with a Fan”, and above all, “The Young Ladies of Avignon”.

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, 1907 by Pablo Picasso. Courtesy of www.PabloPicasso.org

Cubism

Cubism was a different kind of artistic style in which objects are broken apart and are given an abstract shape. Their geometric shapes are highlighted and the style in itself looks both destructive and creative. This form of art was pioneered by Picasso and his friend George Braque. Picasso’s famous cubist paintings are “Three Women” (1907), “Bread and Fruit Dish on a Table” (1909) and “Girl with Mandolin” (1910). 

Classicism (1918-1927)

The World War I turned the theme of Picasso’s paintings from experimentation to realism for a while, therefore, the period is called Classism. His arts are a lot more serious and depict the image of reality. The most famous works during this period include “Three Women at the Spring” (1921), “Two Women Running on the Beach/The Race” (1922) and “The Pipes of Pan” (1923).

Guernica, 1937 by Pablo Picasso. Courtesy of www.PabloPicasso.org

Surrealism

From the Year 1927 onward, Picasso, being a matured man, was caught up in a movement called Surrealism. “Guernica” is one of the all-time famous painting that he completed during this period in 1937.

Later Works

Later in his life, Picasso became an international celebrity. He also joined the Communist Party after the World War II and was honored with international Lenin Peace Prizes twice.

Despite that, he kept creating paintings throughout his life. His important works during this period include “Jacqueline with Flowers”, “Woman sitting in an armchair”, and “The painter II” and “Woman with pillow”. He created “Self Portrait Facing Death” using pencil and crayon, one year before his death.

Death And Family

Picasso died in Mougins, France, on 8th April 1973 when he was 91. The reason of his death was heart failure. 

Despite having relationships with countless women throughout his life, Pablo got married only twice—with Olga Khokhlova in and with Marie-Thérèse Walter. He and Olga had a son together, named Paulo. They spent 9 years together before getting separated. Whereas Walter and Picasso had a long-term relationship and they had a daughter together, Maya. Walter committed a suicide after the death of her husband.

Major Museums That Contain Pablo’s Works

If you wish to see Pablo’s work on display you can find some at these locations:

  • The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago
  • Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland
  • The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia
  • The Metropolitan Museum, New York City
  • The Museum of Modern Art, New York City
  • The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
  • The Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, Saint Joseph, Missouri

Media

Documentary: Pablo Picasso

sdr

” I believe in embracing “Art in All Forms”. Art is all around us, and sometimes you just need to slow down and take a closer look. Art carries many stories and has always been an integral part of human history. It is continuously evolving, changing and adapting to the world around it—Just like human beings, or any other living organism.

I created this blog to build a community to help budding and experienced artists connect, grow and create together. It’s a place where artists can learn and share information, and to keep art meaningful in there lives. Whether it’s going to a museum to observe art, tips on how to improve one’s skills, or simply answer the question, “Where do I even start?”

During my studies, I chose to hone and refine my skills through constant learning, experimentation and practice. I have over 10 years of experience, with a background in painting, sculpture, printmaking, art history and architecture. Recently, I have started to explore photography as well.

I truly believe that we are all born artists and simply forgot…it is never too late to re-start, it is never too late to remember that you are already an artist.”

— Mirsada Simon

Connect & Follow

Where to next?

Categories

— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

The post Artist Intro: Pablo Picasso appeared first on Make it Mirsada.

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Artist Intro: Frida Kahlo https://makeitmirsada.com/artist-intro-frida-kahlo/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=artist-intro-frida-kahlo https://makeitmirsada.com/artist-intro-frida-kahlo/#respond Mon, 28 Oct 2019 13:00:01 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=171 In this article I’ll introduce you to this amazing artist!

Frida was an artist that was in love with life itself and lived her life to the fullest that she possibly could.

At the age of 16, she was involved in a bad trolley accident, leaving her bedridden for a significant portion of her life.

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ARTIST INTRO: FRIDA KAHLO

Birthplace: Coyoacán, Mexico

Favorite mediums: Oil Paint on Canvas

Styles/Periods: Naïve Art, Modern Art, Surrealism, Magical Realism, Symbolism, Naturalism, Primitivism, Social Realism, and Cubism. 

Who Was Frida?

Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, 1940 by Frida Kahlo. Courtesy of fridakahlo.org

Frida was born on July 6, 1907, in Coyoacán, Mexico and died July 13, 1954, in the same city. She was in love with life itself and lived her life to the fullest that she possibly could. At the age of 16, she was involved in a bad trolley accident, leaving her bedridden for a significant portion of her life. Frida’s father would buy her canvases and paints. She had a mirror over her bed and mostly paint self-portraits. 

“I paint self-portraits because I am so often alone, because I am the person I know best.” — Frida Kahlo

Painting and art truly gave Frida a reason to live and a way to express herself. Frida mainly painted from her direct experiences, and often in a Naïve art style that posed powerful questions about identity, gender, and postcolonialism in Mexico.

Frida’s works are commonly labeled under periods and styles such as Naïve Art, Modern Art, Surrealism, Magical Realism, Symbolism, Naturalism, Primitivism, Social Realism, and Cubism.

“They thought I was a Surrealist, but I wasn't. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality.” — Frida Kahlo

Frida also painted things that most women wouldn’t dare to even talk about. One of her most famous paintings, Frida and Cesarean Operation, 1932, depicts a miscarriage she had, and the subsequent pain it caused her.

Frida was a modern woman, and some would even say scandalous. She discreetly had many love affairs, both casual and serious, involving mostly men, but occasionally with women too. However, the love of her life was, and always would be, fellow painter Diego Rivera. She married Diego in 1929, and were together until 1939. A year later they decided to remarry in 1940, and remained so, until her eventual death in 1954.

The cause of their marital separation was mainly due to Diego’s constant love affairs. Extramarital affairs were not entirely uncommon among Mexican men at the time, so Frida was simply expected to deal with it, as would any other Mexican woman.

Without a doubt, Diego was definately the love of her life, but their relationship was nowhere near perfect. He caused her tremendous pain with his affairs, and the one that cut the deepest involved her own sister, Christina! It hurt Frida so much because Christina was her favourite sister, the one she “loved the most”.

Ironically, Diego was also very jealous when Frida decided to have her own lovers, even when they were separated. In general, Frida’s relationship and love for Diego was always a focal point of her artwork.

The Two Fridas, 1939 by Frida Kahlo. Courtesy of fridakahlo.org
Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera photos. Courtesy of vintag.es

“There have been two great accidents in my life. One was the trolley, and the other was Diego. Diego was by far the worst.” — Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo painting in bed. Courtesy of rebloggy.com

Death And Family

Although Frida was plagued by physical pain, and had many surgeries during the course of her life, she refused to let it stop her from living.

Frida lived in the US for a short time to support her husband and his growing career. In later years, she even returned to the US and traveled to France for her own work. Upon her return, Frida became an art teacher at the Escuela Nacional de Pintura in Mexico.

Frida’s first solo exhibition in Mexico, took place in 1953. At this point, Frida could not physically get out of bed anymore, so they decided to take the entire bed to the exhibition!

Frida in bed at final opening, with Concha Michel, Antonio Pelaez, Dr. Roberto Garza, Carmen Farell, Dr. Atl, 1953. Courtesy of pbs.org

“I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy to be alive as long as I can paint.” — Frida Kahlo

This would be Frida’s only exhibition in Mexico due to her deteriorated health, and she passed away in July 1954 at the age of 47. Her last known painting is said to have been done just 8 days before her death. By far it has become her most famous, “Viva La Vida,” (Long Live Life) is considered to be her tribute to life due to its vibrancy in both color and subject.

Viva la Vida (Long Live Life) by Frida Kahlo, 1954

Major Museums That Contain Frida’s Works

If you wish to see Frida’s work on display you can find some at these locations:

  • The Museo Dolores Olmedo is an art museum in the capital of Mexico.
  • The Museum of Modern Art is an art museum located in  Manhattan, New York City.
  • The Detroit Institute of Arts, located in Midtown Detroit, Michigan. 
  • The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts. 
  • The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is a modern art museum located in San Francisco, California.
  • The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is an art museum located on Wilshire Boulevard, in the Miracle Mile vicinity of Los Angeles.
  • The Harry Ransom Center is an archive, library, and museum at the University of Texas at Austin.
  • The National Museum of Women in the Arts, located in Washington, D.C.

Media

Movie: Frida (2002)

Documentary: The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo (2005)

sdr

” I believe in embracing “Art in All Forms”. Art is all around us, and sometimes you just need to slow down and take a closer look. Art carries many stories and has always been an integral part of human history. It is continuously evolving, changing and adapting to the world around it—Just like human beings, or any other living organism.

I created this blog to build a community to help budding and experienced artists connect, grow and create together. It’s a place where artists can learn and share information, and to keep art meaningful in there lives. Whether it’s going to a museum to observe art, tips on how to improve one’s skills, or simply answer the question, “Where do I even start?”

During my studies, I chose to hone and refine my skills through constant learning, experimentation and practice. I have over 10 years of experience, with a background in painting, sculpture, printmaking, art history and architecture. Recently, I have started to explore photography as well.

I truly believe that we are all born artists and simply forgot…it is never too late to re-start, it is never too late to remember that you are already an artist.”

— Mirsada Simon

Connect & Follow

Where to next?

Categories

— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

The post Artist Intro: Frida Kahlo appeared first on Make it Mirsada.

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Visiting the Whitney Museum of American Art https://makeitmirsada.com/visiting-the-whitney-museum-of-american-art/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=visiting-the-whitney-museum-of-american-art https://makeitmirsada.com/visiting-the-whitney-museum-of-american-art/#respond Mon, 02 Sep 2019 17:30:00 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=169 In this handy guide, we’ve put together some helpful info and tips to enhance your next visit to: The Whitney Museum of American Art.

The Whitney Museum presents a full range of Twentieth Century and Contemporary American Art.

It was the first museum dedicated to the work of *LIVING* American artists.

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Visiting the Whitney Museum of American Art

In this handy guide, we’ve put together some helpful info and tips to enhance your visit to the Whitney Museum of American Art!

The Whitney Museum of American Art  presents a full range of Twentieth Century and Contemporary American Art, with a special focus on works by living artists. 

The Whitney also features amazing views of NYC from its outdoor terraces, and not to mention that the surrounding area is packed with a ton of cool bars and restaurants to choose from.

Getting Started

Begin with planning

The Whitney Museum of American Art is a small museum that you can cover in just one day. If you are coming from out of town, I strongly recommend this particular museum. It was the first museum dedicated to the work of living American artists.  The building itself is an experience designed by architect Renzo Piano. 

It is located in the Meatpacking District, a trendy commercial area on the far west side of Manhattan. 

Picking the Right Day and How Long Should I Stay?

To pick the right day I would keep in mind the weather to have the full experience of this Museum going on the outdoor terraces is a must and you will be missing out on the artwork outside. Not to mention the breathtaking views.
So because it is a small museum you don’t have to watch out for Museum Fatigue! You can do in one day. You do not have to rush through to see everything. The Whitney Museum has some very interactive exhibits, and some that are very different, I can even say shocking at times. Take your time to watch every video, and walk into every room because you never know what to expect next.

Now just because the Whitney Museum is on the smaller side, don’t think that one visit is enough to see it all. The Whitney Museum changes its exhibits pretty often because they showcase living American artists—so there’s always something new.

Should I Buy an Online Ticket?

  • Yes and no, it depends on your situation…I’ll explain further. The Whitney Museum has different options depending on the day you want to visit. 

    • Adults – $25

    • Seniors, Students, and Visitors with Disabilities (with valid student ID) – $18

    • CUNY Student  (with valid student ID at admissions desk) Free!!! 

    Pay-What-You-Wish: Fridays from 7 pm–10 pm

    Pay-what-you-wish tickets are available at the admissions desk on Fridays from 7 pm to 9:30 pm. They may not be purchased in advance.

    If you are visiting during a weekday then it doesn’t matter if you buy online or at the admissions desk. However, on the weekend it’s a different story, it can get PACKED —to the point where the line is out the front door. For the weekends, I recommend purchasing your ticket in advance. Once I even waited in line for 45 minutes on a Saturday in the summer. 

    Museum members enter for free. 

Location, Location, Location

The Whitney Museum of American Art is located at 99 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014. It is located between the High Line and the Hudson River in the Meatpacking District. 

I don’t recommend driving, as with most places in NYC, there is not much street parking available. This area currently has a lot of construction zones as well, making the driving situation even more of a nightmare. There are a few parking garages in the area, but be warned, they tend to be pricey. 

While At The Museum

How do you navigate the museum?

 When you enter The Whitney Museum on the first floor is the Whitney Shop and the admissions desk. They have two, one is for members only and the other is for the general public. The general public is on the same side as the shop. There is a security station that will ask to inspect your bags. 

They have a bag and coat check in on the floor below. They prefer if you don’t carry larger bags, so I recommended packing light. You can wear your backpack on the front or hold it in your hand on the side. 

Guided Tours

They also have free daily tours, the times change based on the day of the week and the current exhibits—just ask staff and they will tell you. If you prefer to be solo they also have a mobile guide. 

Whitney Mobile Guide

They have a free Streaming Mobile Guide available online for you to use. The Whitney Museum has free public WiFi. They sell both earphones and portable chargers at the Whitney Shop located on the first floor if needed. Don’t want to use your phone? That’s fine too, you can rent a device during your visit—they’re available at the desk in the Lobby.

Whitney Signs tours 

This is a gallery tour in ASL (American Sign Language), that takes place on the first Saturday afternoon of each month. They are always preceded by a free wine and cheese reception in the Laurie M. Tisch Education Center. 

It has a  limited capacity, and they do not allow ASL students to attend. Voice interpretation on tours is available upon request, though advance registration is required. Check-in is on Floor One. Can’t make that time? No worries, they have private tours in ASL available upon request with a three weeks notice. 

Verbal Description and Touch Tours

The Whitney Museum’s verbal description tours provide an opportunity for visitors. Have a friend or loved one that is blind or has low vision? The Whitney verbal description tours provide an opportunity for visitors to experience the richness and diversity of twentieth- and twenty-first-century American art. Explore Whitney’s collection or special exhibitions with a verbal description of the works on display, while experiencing a selection of objects through touch. They have Manual wheelchairs, stools, and assistive listening devices are available for all touch programs.

These tours are free, and 90-minute tours take place when the galleries are closed to the general public. These tours are held monthly as well if requested with a three weeks advance notice. To place a request or inquire about the next scheduled tour, you can contact them at accessfeedback@whitney.org or (212) 570-7789.

 

Programs 

Open Studio 

This Open Studio is accessible on Saturdays and Sundays from 10:30 am–3 pm. It is welcomed to families with kids of all ages. There is a different art-making project every weekend and meets are at the Laurie M. Tisch Education Center on Floor 3. It is Free !!!!! (with Museum admission) This is the weekend you may want to ticket online in advance.  If you have questions about this  Family Programs you can call 212-570-7713 or email familyprograms@whitney.org.

 School Programs

 If you’re a teacher that wants to take their class on a trip, they have Guided Visits for that too. This program is for K-12 students and are thematic gallery tours that build upon classroom learning. 

Want something a little more than just a tour no problem they also have Guided Visit + Studio. This is a 1-hour tour and 1 hour in the art-making workshop. You can follow this link to SUBMIT A REQUEST.

Family Fun for Families with Kids on the Autism Spectrum

The Whitney has something for everyone, they have sensory-friendly gallery activities and hands-on art-making workshops before the Museum opens to the general public for children on the autism spectrum. This program occurs every three months for kids ages 6 and up. Registration is required. You can Email accessfeedback@whitney.org if you have any questions about this program.

Courses

Expand your perspectives through innovative courses offered every fall, winter, and spring. 

You can email courses@whitney.org to get more info on:

  • Crash Courses
  • In-Depth
  • How to Look

Feeling Hungry Yet?

  • On the first floor, there is the “Untitled”, a seasonal American restaurant, open to the public.  
  • On the eighth floor is the Studio Cafe, they serve coffee, pastries, and seasonal salads, sandwiches, and soups. 

Photo Ops!

Do it for the ‘gram! Renzo Piano, the architect, designed this building to be an immersive experience. Each space has its own unique charm. He took full advantage of the location and the fact that you are in New York City. The outdoor terraces not only house intriguing exhibits, but you can also enjoy great views of the city.

Capture the best moments with popular photo opportunities/ spots. Unless stated otherwise, you are free to take photos in any area of the museum. You can pause at the entrance with your friends and family as you exit and get some great shots!

What’s next ?

The High Line

Just because you finished your tour of the museum doesn’t mean that the fun has to end. I strongly recommend walking the nearby High Line. It is a public park built atop a historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. It is a beautiful park with gardens, outdoor art, and food vendors along its 1.45 mile-long stretch.

Art Galleries, Restaurants, Entertainment & More...

There are plenty of different restaurants and art galleries around the museum as well.  Be sure to check out the nearby Allouche Gallery right across the street from the Whitney’s main entrance. It’s an open gallery so just stroll on in and check it out…don’t be shy!

As for restaurants, they are abundant within the Meatpacking district. Just pick a direction and walk a few mins and you’re bound to stumble into some interesting grub!

sdr

” I believe in embracing “Art in All Forms”. Art is all around us, and sometimes you just need to slow down and take a closer look. Art carries many stories and has always been an integral part of human history. It is continuously evolving, changing and adapting to the world around it—Just like human beings, or any other living organism.

I created this blog to build a community to help budding and experienced artists connect, grow and create together. It’s a place where artists can learn and share information, and to keep art meaningful in there lives. Whether it’s going to a museum to observe art, tips on how to improve one’s skills, or simply answer the question, “Where do I even start?”

During my studies, I chose to hone and refine my skills through constant learning, experimentation and practice. I have over 10 years of experience, with a background in painting, sculpture, printmaking, art history and architecture. Recently, I have started to explore photography as well.

I truly believe that we are all born artists and simply forgot…it is never too late to re-start, it is never too late to remember that you are already an artist.”

— Mirsada Simon

Connect & Follow

Where to next?

Categories

— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

The post Visiting the Whitney Museum of American Art appeared first on Make it Mirsada.

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3 Things You Probably Don’t Know About Calligraphy https://makeitmirsada.com/things-you-probably-dont-know-about-calligraphy/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=things-you-probably-dont-know-about-calligraphy https://makeitmirsada.com/things-you-probably-dont-know-about-calligraphy/#respond Mon, 05 Aug 2019 17:00:00 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=167

In this article, I’ll discuss a few key features of calligraphy that you may not have already known.

Calligraphy is the art of beautiful handwriting. Some may think that it’s just a fancy version of cursive writing, but there are many differences that set these two writing styles a world apart.

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3 Simple Things You Probably Don't Know About Calligraphy

#1 Calligraphy is NOT the same as Cursive handwriting.

Calligraphy consists of a series of individual, separate strokes in order to create each letter. Cursive on the other hand is a continuous writing style focused on completing each word.

Lifting the pen matters!

In calligraphy it’s important to lift the pen often, unlike when writing in cursive. It improves your overall consistency and precision. Also, some strokes may begin from a different point where your last stroke ended. 

How you hold the pen or brush matters!

Properly holding your pen while following through on your strokes helps to maintain consistency. It also reduces the wear and tear on your equipment that lead to frayed brushes or broken nibs. Not to mention it reduces the strain on your hands and wrists when you hold your pen or brush in a comfortable position.

Stroke consistency is key in calligraphy! 

Did I already mention that consistency is IMPORTANT in calligraphy? The precision and manner in which you implement each stroke greatly affects how well your overall project will turn out. Like any skill, there is no substitute for constant practice and repetition.

#2 Calligraphy has 9 Basic Strokes

The 9 basic strokes are:

  1. The Upstroke
  2. The Downstroke
  3. The Overturn
  4. The Underturn
  5. The Compound Curve
  6. The Oval
  7. The Ascending Loop
  8. The Descending Loop
  9. The Comma Dot

#3 Calligraphy has many different scripts to choose from.

Based on the “nib” or tip that is used, there are TWO popular groups of calligraphy—Broad (wide) nib or Pointed nib. Each group contains several popular scripts or styles as well.

Broad or Wide nib calligraphy scripts

  • Blackletter (Gothic)
  • Italic
  • Roman capitals
  • Uncials

Pointed Nib calligraphy scripts

  • Copperplate
  • Spencerian
  • Modern

“I’ve always been a ‘jack of all trades’ kind of person. I consider myself to be a true generalist, and a bit of an autodidact with constant thirst for knowledge. Growing up, I was always that one kid in the room that took all the toys apart and spent the next couple hours figuring out how to put them back together again. This reverse-engineering, logical and structured mindset has always been the central core of my personality…until I met Mirsada, and was introduced to ART!

Art became this puzzle that couldn’t simply solve by breaking it down and put back together again. Mirsada taught me to embrace art for all it’s intrinsic values. I soon realized that artists expressed themselves directly through their work. I learned that true masters of art are even able to convey all their thoughts, emotions, experiences, aspirations, and even their souls to those that bear witness to their work.

Currently, I work in the pharmaceutical and healthcare sectors at some of the largest hospital systems in NYC. I also write for my Personal Finance blog, Simoners.com

In a city so immersed in art culture, I’m soaking it in each and everyday in a self-indulgent pursuit to understand art in all forms.”

— Isaiah Simon

Connect & Follow

Website

Where to next?

Categories

— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

The post 3 Things You Probably Don’t Know About Calligraphy appeared first on Make it Mirsada.

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11 Pro Tips To Improve Your Drawing Skills https://makeitmirsada.com/pro-tips-to-improve-your-drawing-skills/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pro-tips-to-improve-your-drawing-skills https://makeitmirsada.com/pro-tips-to-improve-your-drawing-skills/#respond Mon, 29 Jul 2019 17:00:00 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=165 In this article, I break down 11 Pro Tips To Improve Your Drawing Skills.

Have you ever felt the hunger to draw better? Held back by the same roadblocks over and over again? Tired of hearing practice makes perfect, but not seeing results despite your consistent practice?

Like any other skill in the world, drawing requires not just practice but also a smart approach that helps you progress over time. And we are here to help you figure out just that approach!

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11 PRO TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR DRAWING SKILLS

In this article, we break down 11 Pro Tips to Improve Your Drawing Skills.

Have you ever felt the hunger to draw better? Held back by the same roadblocks over and over again? Tired of hearing practice makes perfect, but not seeing results despite your consistent practice?

Like any other skill in the world, drawing requires not just practice but also a smart approach that helps you progress over time. And we’re here to help you figure out just that approach!

Tip # 1: It’s OK To Be Messy

Sketching is your safe space for creative play, and there’s no reason it has to be flawless. Let free your hands and your mind, and draw some elements that don’t belong, or some lines that don’t make sense. All of this will allow you to brainstorm ways to make the whole picture more creative and layered. Sometimes stray lines will lead to wonderful accidents, and new ideas will emerge that add to the narrative of the sketch. Just remember: what you’re drawing isn’t necessarily the final rendered piece. It’s simply a platform to develop new ideas!

Tip # 2 : Doodle

Doodling is a great way to work on your drawing skills and going wild with your imagination. There are no rules to keep in mind, there are no boundaries to abide by. Just grab your favorite drawing tool and draw what oozes out of your mind. The creative freedom you enjoy in your doodles will help you evolve as an artist and also make you learn how to draw with your instinct.

Tip # 3: Silhouettes Are Key

Whether you’re drawing from imagination or using a reference piece – it is extremely important that you thoroughly consider the shape of the silhouette. Drawing a strong silhouette will add to the nuance and personality of the image, and lead to a more cohesive structure.

Do keep in mind that you’ll want to tweak these edges as soon as possible, so you don’t end up having to change them later, when much more detail has been added into the piece.

photo-1513836279014-a89f7a76ae86

Tip # 4: Find Inspiration In Nature

Nature is absolutely the most inspiring and accessible subject in art. Flora, fauna, and flowers are some of the elements that you’ll find in so many of the most popular artworks in the world. Just grab your creative tool, and try to convey to the canvas what inspired you about your surroundings. The inspiration you’re looking for might be found on the top of a mountain, the shore on a beach, or in a tiny plant growing in your backyard!

Tip # 5: Learn The Rules Before Breaking Them

It’s OK to free-form and draw whatever comes to your mind. Artists are known to be notorious rule breakers in their life, and their art is no exception. However, this doesn’t mean you overlook the importance of a structured approach, rigorous practice and conventional techniques. These will help you understand the basics of drawing and sketching, and prevent you from getting frustrated with your drawing just not looking quite right. Once you believe you’ve mastered all the conventional approaches to your craft, it’s definitely time to switch it up and break all the rules you’ve built on.

photo-1517971071642-34a2d3ecc9cd

Tip # 6: Keep A Journal

Keeping a notebook or journal with you allows you to start drawing the moment inspiration strikes. This way, you’ll be able to easily track your progress, practice over time and literally witness how your art evolves

Tip # 7: Experiment With Different Mediums

We get it. Familiarity is always the safest way to approach your art, and TJ’s difficult to change the drawing tools you’re so comfortable with. You might be one of those people who only draw in pen, and have convinced themselves that this is the only style you can execute.  However, when you choose to challenge yourself and pick up those pencils, you’ll notice changes in your art that will intrigue you even more. You’ll see a more blended, soft effect and a completely different tone to your drawing. In short, don’t stick to just one drawing medium!

photo-1525340941843-5ab5dd974e0d

Tip # 8: Hands Are Just As Important As Eyes

If you happen to be drawing a human subject, you’ll likely spend more time considering their eyes than their hands. However, fact is, eyes and hands are equally powerful in terms of driving the narrative and letting the viewer know what the subject is up to. A relaxed hand shows calm and peace, whereas a contorted hand exhibits anguish or pain. Bottom line – don’t overlook the hands!

Tip # 9: Draw Everywhere

Draw on the train, the bus, during lunch, free times at work, before you go to sleep and right you’ve woken up. Don’t keep a restriction on when or where you’re going to draw. Maybe, you’ll be able to draw better in the morning when you feel more organized. Or maybe you’ll realize how you can sketch better in the evening when you’re unwinding from the day and a little more relaxed. As for location –  It’s possible you’ll be more inspired drawing from a picture or photograph than real life. Or vice versa. These are things you’ll only get to learn if you’re constantly drawing and gaining new experiences. As your experience increases and your drawing subjects evolve more and more, you will be at peace with your own art.

Tip # 10: Use A Reference

We get it. You want everything that comes out your canvas to be perfectly original and flawless. But that kind of mindset will prevent you from evolving your art!  When you first begin drawing, search online or grab an art book you like, and try to copy what you see. Copying others’ artwork will help you learn how to draw different types of mouth, eyes, feet, dogs, cats, etc. Of course, after you’ve practiced enough of drawing other artworks, you’ll have gained the knowledge and confidence required to devise your own illustrations without having to copy from anywhere. Do remember – if you decide to post a drawing you copied on the Internet, make sure to credit the original artist!

Tip # 11: Make a Portfolio

Sure, you’re likely a recluse who likes to paint and draw in their free time and doesn’t have time to share it with the world. But why not want your talent with the world?!

If there’s one thing we urge you all to do in 2k19 – it’s to start a portfolio! Stop throwing away your half-finished projects and sketches and start filing them properly. You owe it to your talent to maintain a well-presented record of your work. This will allow you to protect your drawings from dog-ears and coffee rings, feel more organized, and being able to flick through and witness how you’ve progressed over time.

sdr

” I believe in embracing “Art in All Forms”. Art is all around us, and sometimes you just need to slow down and take a closer look. Art carries many stories and has always been an integral part of human history. It is continuously evolving, changing and adapting to the world around it—Just like human beings, or any other living organism.

I created this blog to build a community to help budding and experienced artists connect, grow and create together. It’s a place where artists can learn and share information, and to keep art meaningful in there lives. Whether it’s going to a museum to observe art, tips on how to improve one’s skills, or simply answer the question, “Where do I even start?”

During my studies, I chose to hone and refine my skills through constant learning, experimentation and practice. I have over 10 years of experience, with a background in painting, sculpture, printmaking, art history and architecture. Recently, I have started to explore photography as well.

I truly believe that we are all born artists and simply forgot…it is never too late to re-start, it is never too late to remember that you are already an artist.”

— Mirsada Simon

Connect & Follow

Where to next?

Categories

— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

The post 11 Pro Tips To Improve Your Drawing Skills appeared first on Make it Mirsada.

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Top Museums In NYC That You *Have* To Visit https://makeitmirsada.com/top-museums-in-nyc-that-you-have-to-visit/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=top-museums-in-nyc-that-you-have-to-visit https://makeitmirsada.com/top-museums-in-nyc-that-you-have-to-visit/#respond Mon, 22 Jul 2019 17:00:00 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=18 In this article, we break down some of the Top Museums in NYC that you *have* to visit.

NYC offers some of the best museums in the world. From history to art, sculpture and photography - there’s something for everyone! If you are visiting NYC and looking to explore it’s museums, we’ve got you covered.

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TOP MUSEUMS IN NYC THAT YOU *HAVE* TO VISIT

In this article, we break down some of the Top Museums in NYC that you *have* to visit:

Museums get a bad rep for no reason. Even the word museum tends to bore people, and often functions as a Tumblr date idea that no one wants to try anymore.

Now, forget the museum branding, and focus on their raison d’etre: highlighting the history, science, and art of the whole world – all distilled into one experience that you can witness for the cost of chewing gum. Doesn’t sound like such a bad idea, does it?

And when you’re in NYC, missing out on visiting a museum is the sin you just don’t want to commit!

NYC offers some of the best museums in the world. From history to art, sculpture and photography – there’s something for everyone! If you’re a visiting NYC and looking to explore it’s museums, we’ve got you covered.

 

The Metropolitan Museum Of Art (MET)

The classic Metropolitan Museum of Art has to be the first museum stop for any newbie to NYC. This museum has permanent collection so huge that’s impossible to see at once.

This is the kind of place that’s worth a second visit, or third, just to fully witness all it has to offer.  Some of our favorites are the Oceania section (totem poles, indigenous animal carvings), the Japanese Garden, the Medieval Section, and the Temple of Dendur (serene watering pools, ancient mummies).

If you happen to be visiting anytime soon this Summer, make sure to find your way to the top roof deck for a fantastic view of Central Park and the city. When you’re exhausted and worn out after watching so much art all day – unwind in the Cocktail Bar inside!

Be sure to check out our handy guide to visiting the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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The Museum Of Modern Art (MoMA)

Recently renovated Oct, 2019!

The Museum of Modern Art is the ideal weekend afternoon museum, because it’s not too large to tackle, yet the space is still bright and airy.

Visitors usually flock to the Dali surrealist paintings, Claude Monet’s Water Lily painting, Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon and Campbell soup label exhibit.

This museum is also known for its bar and dining room. We recommend going to the Modern Dining room if you get the chance. The food here absolutely delicious!

Brooklyn Museum Of Art

One of the largest museums in America, the Brooklyn Museum Of Art has around 1.5 million pieces of artwork. The museum displays American decorative arts and a range of American sculptures and paintings, with related items from the Native American and Spanish Colonial holdings.

Apart from the absolutely stunning exhibitions, you’ll also get to take in literary readings, view film screenings, and see live music performances. The first floor features Infinite Blue, a unique collection showcasing the color blue in numerous varieties with contemporary works as well as ancient ones.

After exploring this collection, proceed to the 2nd floor for a look at Asian art. Then, move on upwards to a fine collection of Egyptian art. You won’t be left quenching for more art after this visit!

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American Museum Of Natural History

Elephants! Dinosaurs! Whales! This is the Natural History Museum, where you can indulge in your ultimate jungle fantasy without any inhibitions. It’s a thrill-a-minute, taking you on a global journey deep down into the sea, up mountains and through jungles. You can even explore outer space at the planetarium nearby. Basically, this is as close as you can get to real-life Jumanji – except there’s more adventure, more thrill and more creativity!

The Frick Collection

Mansion/Museum spaces are always a delight to visit because they’re able to highlight art and beautiful architecture in one memorable experience. The Frick is a visually stunning mansion on the Upper East Side. Think of the Jacquemart Andre museum/mansion in Paris. That’s the vibe of The Frick. 

The building was originally designed by one of the world’s most successful industrialists: Henry Clay Frick.

Inside, the museum is decorated lavishly with art and period furniture pieces. There’s a beautiful open air Garden Court close to the main entrance, with greenery, a fountain and skylight. The place is so gorgeous, it has hosted a bunch fashion shows during NYFW. The rest of the house is equally stunning as well, but visitors are not allowed to take pictures. 

Despite the somewhat pricey admission, we really recommend visiting the Frick!

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The New York Transit Museum

To preserve cherish its history, NYC’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s museum showcases exhibits that celebrate the future, past and present of the subway. Here, you get to see everything from artifacts from previous decades, educational exhibits on the subway’s creation, and art installations. 

This is perhaps the most important part of NYC’s infrastructure, as the subway system connects all 5 boroughs through its network of subterranean tunnels. 

You’ll find inside an extra gift shop in Grand Central Station with a few small pieces you can see while passing through, but the museum itself is a brief subway ride away in Brooklyn.

The Museum Of Sex

The Museum Of Sex has become renowned as one of the best museums in NYC for its uncompromising, fun look at a taboo subject.

The entrance to this museum will greet you with a range of accessories, tools and books that all pertain to the same subject mentioned in the Museum’s name. The things you’ll get to see here are tasteful yet titillating. For anyone aged 18 and over, there’s a whole world to explore in the museum.

You’ll find here a balance between more sensationalized, explicit subjects (like, the Jump For Joy exhibit that comprises inflated breasts you can bounce on), as well as some deeper meaning exhibits that  explore the art, history and nature of sex. Simply visiting the gift shop alone is an exciting enough activity!

The museum also has one of the best bars in the neighborhood. When you’re tired from a day of browsing the museum, this is the place to grab a beer, tea or coffee before proceeding with your Museum exploration.

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Museum Of The City Of New York

The Museum of the City of New York (MCNY) was established in 1923, with a mission is to present, collect and preserve objects related to the original history and culture of NYC. The museum boasts a huge collection of unusual items, such as a display of graffiti art and writings from the 1970s,  man’s suit worn to George Washington’s Inaugural Ball, no less than 412 glass negatives by famous photographer Jacob Riis, a complete room of Duncan Phyfe furniture, and several of Eugene O’Neill’s handwritten manuscripts.

“I’ve always been a ‘jack of all trades’ kind of person. I consider myself to be a true generalist, and a bit of an autodidact with constant thirst for knowledge. Growing up, I was always that one kid in the room that took all the toys apart and spent the next couple hours figuring out how to put them back together again. This reverse-engineering, logical and structured mindset has always been the central core of my personality…until I met Mirsada, and was introduced to ART!

Art became this puzzle that couldn’t simply solve by breaking it down and put back together again. Mirsada taught me to embrace art for all it’s intrinsic values. I soon realized that artists expressed themselves directly through their work. I learned that true masters of art are even able to convey all their thoughts, emotions, experiences, aspirations, and even their souls to those that bear witness to their work.

Currently, I work in the pharmaceutical and healthcare sectors at some of the largest hospital systems in NYC. I also write for my Personal Finance blog, Simoners.com

In a city so immersed in art culture, I’m soaking it in each and everyday in a self-indulgent pursuit to understand art in all forms.”

— Isaiah Simon

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— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

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The New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden https://makeitmirsada.com/the-new-york-chinese-scholars-garden/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-new-york-chinese-scholars-garden https://makeitmirsada.com/the-new-york-chinese-scholars-garden/#respond Mon, 15 Jul 2019 17:00:00 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=22 On the grounds of Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden lies a hidden retreat, The New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden.

Recently, I’ve had the opportunity to visit this natural refuge that shifted my mind from my busy to-do list and transported me to a place of contemplation and relaxation.

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THE NEW YORK CHINESE SCHOLAR'S GARDEN

On the grounds of Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden lies a hidden retreat, The New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden. Recently, I’ve had the opportunity to visit this natural refuge that shifted my mind from my busy to-do list and transported me to a place of contemplation and relaxation.

The New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden

Staten Island, New York

Travel back to the days of Imperial China, the era of dynasties, when powerful emperors ruled the vast country. These emperors needed government officials to help govern China’s affairs and thus the role of a scholar was created. To obtain the prestigious position of a scholar, a person would study a range of subjects before taking an exam. Upon passing this exam, one would then be considered a scholar. A day in the life of an imperial scholar was extremely stressful! To manage this stress, scholars usually had gardens built as a relaxing retreat — think of a “staycation”.

The purpose of these scholars’ gardens were to promote peace; encapsulating the Eastern ideals that harmony should exist between man and nature. When visiting the New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden that ideal is shown through the traditional features of a Chinese garden. Unlike the European gardens that are displayed throughout Snug Harbor, the Chinese Scholar’s Garden doesn’t conform to the beauty of symmetrical layouts or neatly trimmed foliage and lawns. In fact, the architectural features of the Chinese Scholar’s Garden appear to flow with the natural landscape; ultimately highlighting the raw beauty of the environment. The result of this design feels as if you are truly immersed in nature; there is a sense of balance and wholeness. Instinctively, you want to pause and admire your surroundings.

After this illuminating experience, I was curious about the characteristics that made the visit feel special. I discovered that an authentic Chinese garden consists of four main features:

1. Rocks:

Providing the garden with strength and stability, rocks are selected for their shape, size, and color are found in every Chinese garden. The most valued rocks are limestones because of their eroded states as they serve as decoration inside some of the garden’s buildings. Large mountainous rocks are found in the gardens and usually for aesthetic appeal.

2. Water:

Water is an important element in Chinese culture, just think of the philosophy of 5 elements. The theme of water can usually be found throughout a Chinese garden. Ponds, although usually found in the center of the garden, can also be found throughout the garden. These ponds are usually home to aquatic lotus plants and fish such as goldfish or carp.

3. Greenery:

Chinese gardeners select plants, flowers, and trees based on their shape, balance, and even fragrance! In the New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden, among a variety of flowers, you will find plants known as the 3 Plants of Winter. These plants are bamboo, pine trees, and plum trees. They are special because they all flourish and endure in the winter when all other plants are wither.

4. Architecture:

The places of contemplation, conversation, and meditation. The structures found in Chinese gardens are built to complement the landscape. Typically, the gardens are enclosed within a white wall that accentuates the nature around it. Pavilions, tea houses, libraries, bridges and galleries are strategically built around the garden often blending in with the environment.

The beauty of the New York Scholar’s Garden is displayed through the meticulously crafted and unique characteristics of Eastern ideals; beliefs that reflect that we should not control nature, but should connect with our surroundings.

If you are looking for a peaceful place to relax or just interested in experiencing the natural beauty of an authentic Chinese scholar’s garden, come visit The New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden. I guarantee it will be a worthwhile experience!

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“Samantha is a 20-something year old native New Yorker, an avid reader, and a huge couch potato. As a child, Samantha could be found in her room reading, writing, or drawing. She is proud to report that as an adult, she can still be found in her room reading, writing, or drawing. Art and literature have always played a major role in her life and she is excited to edit and write for Make It Mirsada!

Currently, Samantha is a student majoring in English and hopes to pursue a career in publishing. In the meantime, she keeps herself sane by reading manga, YA fiction, science-fiction, fantasy novels, and watching a ton of anime.

She also enjoys visiting museums, loitering in Barnes and Nobles, and attending Comic Cons, Book Cons and other geeky events.”

— Samantha Correa

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— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

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9 Great Techniques For Painting Better Landscapes https://makeitmirsada.com/great-techniques-for-painting-better-landscapes/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=great-techniques-for-painting-better-landscapes https://makeitmirsada.com/great-techniques-for-painting-better-landscapes/#respond Mon, 08 Jul 2019 19:21:00 +0000 https://makeitmirsada.com/?p=16 In this article, I break down 9 Great Techniques For Painting Better Landscapes.

Landscape painting can be as simple or complicated as you make it for yourself. It's a brilliant art-form for people who are just starting out with painting.

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9 GREAT TECHNIQUES FOR PAINTING BETTER LANDSCAPES

In this article, we break down 9 Great Techniques For Painting Better Landscapes. 

Landscape painting can be as simple or complicated as you make it for yourself. It’s a brilliant artform for people who are just starting out with painting.

You can use a variety of materials and techniques to portray what you see in front of you. However, not many budding artists make the effort to truly master the art of landscape painting. 

#1: Avoid Creating A Clutter

Not everything that is present in the real-life scene has to be included in your depiction. Sometimes, a scene is really picturesque with all its elements, but may be too busy to be fully captured in a painting. It’s your job to simplify this clutter and prioritize what has to be part of the painting. 

Some things are disruptive to the composition of the painting. Others, a mere distraction for the viewer. You can choose to leave out entire buildings, or move them to a different area in the painting, all of which will contribute to an effective composition. A great way to simplify the scene is by starting with a value sketch.

Your focus, as an artist, should be on creating a painting that grabs your viewers’ attention and guides their eyes throughout the composition through color, lines and value contrast. 

#2: Give The Illusion Of Numbers

In landscape painting, it is often a better idea in many situations to give the illusion of numbers, instead of trying to paint every object individually.

For instance, if you happen to be painting a forest of trees, don’t paint each tree individually. Not only would that be quite complicated to paint, it also won’t have the artistic twinge that elevates your work. Instead, try to paint the general tones and shapes that inhabit the forest, and detail only a few trees. You will hence be able to depict a forest beautifully without having to paint so many elements. 

#3: The Color Of Light Determines The Color Of Everything Else

On a sunny day, the light of the sun is bright, warm and more intense. On overcast days, all colors are dull and shifts in value are not as noticeable.

If the sunlight is bluish or red, every element in the scene must have some of that color reflected on it. The sunlight won’t just make everything lighter, but also yellower.

The point being – mix the color of light into everything to get an idea of a specific atmosphere. This will make your painting harmonious in color, and more uniform in nature. 

#4: Learn To Embrace Imperfection

Many new landscape artists make the mistake of chasing the perfect image. They want to smoothen every element of their painting – often at a compromise on realism, quality, and personality. Here’s what you need to always remember: you’re not trying to create a perfect rendition of the scene. If that was the aim, you could’ve just used a camera!

Imperfection is a part of nature. And it will be a part of your art. Learn to embrace imperfection because you can’t possibly make everything perfect. Hence, you don’t have to feel pressure to be completely accurate with structure, colors and values as you see in still life portraits and scenes. There is definitely a significant amount of leverage for artists in landscape painting. Of course, that’s not an excuse to be sloppy!

#5: Atmospheric Perspective Influences Both Values And Colors

In many landscape paintings, the objects happen to be placed far away. Therefore the amount of atmosphere or air between the viewer and the object can be huge. Air contains floating particles and humidity that creates a filter that influences how we see the intensity and the value of colors.

You can witness this for yourself when driving on a highway. Trees and bushes closer to you are darker and crisper, whereas those closer to the horizon are lighter and grayer. This effect is called atmospheric perspective. When immersed in your landscape portrait, make sure to keep this factor in mind for a more realistic impression. 

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#6: Incorporate Timed Sketches To Improve Your Judgment

One of the best ways to improve on your landscape painting ability is to practice quick, timed sketches into your routine. Try to paint a simple landscape scene, and keep the canvas size as small as possible. Try and finish as soon as possible (not more than 30 minutes, as a general rule). You could do these from a photograph or “en plein air” (outdoors) – doesn’t really matter!

The finished work won’t necessarily be perfect, but that’s not exactly the purpose. By painting these fast landscapes, you will learn to train your ability to judge colors and values, and eventually paint more instinctively.

#7: Give Preference To The Foreground

Don’t make the mistake of painting the whole landscape to the same degree of detail. This takes away from the nuance in your picture. Instead, paint lesser detail in the background of the landscape than you do in the foreground.

This is helpful because it gives more ‘authority’ to what you place in your foreground. This difference in detail will also draw the attention of the viewer onto the main focus of the landscape painting.

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#8: Use The Best Of Your Imagination

Most of the landscape paintings you set out to draw will not be postcard scenes, but rather meant to just capture the essence of the landscape.

If it makes for a stronger painting composition, don’t hold back in rearranging the elements of the landscape. Or take elements from various landscapes and combine them all in one painting. Obviously, this won’t work if you’re painting a readily identifiable, famous scene. But if you’re looking to just practice your craft and get better at it, this is a great way to begin!

#9: Enjoy The Experience!

Painting isn’t easy work, and improving your craft is a lifelong pursuit. It’s important to challenge yourself to learn from the artists who came before you, and from your contemporaries who inspire you.

However, don’t let all of this get in the way of enjoying painting, and savoring the experience of being out in nature, and possibly having a pleasant day with your friends!

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” I believe in embracing “Art in All Forms”. Art is all around us, and sometimes you just need to slow down and take a closer look. Art carries many stories and has always been an integral part of human history. It is continuously evolving, changing and adapting to the world around it—Just like human beings, or any other living organism.

I created this blog to build a community to help budding and experienced artists connect, grow and create together. It’s a place where artists can learn and share information, and to keep art meaningful in there lives. Whether it’s going to a museum to observe art, tips on how to improve one’s skills, or simply answer the question, “Where do I even start?”

During my studies, I chose to hone and refine my skills through constant learning, experimentation and practice. I have over 10 years of experience, with a background in painting, sculpture, printmaking, art history and architecture. Recently, I have started to explore photography as well.

I truly believe that we are all born artists and simply forgot…it is never too late to re-start, it is never too late to remember that you are already an artist.”

— Mirsada Simon

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— if you’re reading this and have tips of your own to share, please do so in the comments section or connect with us on social media!

Remember to share your experiences as you embrace “Art in All Forms

We are a community of artists and professionals that believe art is powerful, especially in the way that it impacts our society.”

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